Bill C-32: Second and Third Weeks Commentary Round-up

A busy couple of weeks (including the ever-eventful Banff World Television and nextMEDIA extravaganza)  has meant that the Signal has fallen behind in keeping track of the commentary occasioned by the release of Bill C-32 (The Copyright Modernization Act).  That being said, here are links to items we thought worth drawing attention to from the last ten days:

As a reminder, here at the Signal we’re going to do our best over the next few months to keep tabs on developments and commentary, from a variety of perspectives, surrounding Bill C-32, so we invite readers to check back often (clicking the “Bill C-32” tag below will bring you to an index of all posts on the Signal about the topic).

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Bob Tarantino

About Bob Tarantino

Bob Tarantino is Counsel at Dentons Canada LLP and focuses his practice on the interface between the entertainment industries and intellectual property law, with an emphasis on film and television production, financing, licensing, distribution, and IP acquisition and protection. His clients range from artists and independent producers to Canadian distributors and foreign studios and financiers at every stage of the creative process, from development to delivery and exploitation.

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One reply on “Bill C-32: Second and Third Weeks Commentary Round-up”

  1. In my article, “Modernization of the Inconceivable”, at http://mincov.com/articles/index.php/fullarticle/modernization_of_the_inconceivable/ (http://bit.ly/8YQZ3r), I explain why modernization of the copyright law based on compromise and concessions, without a good understanding of the underlying principles of copyright protection, is doomed to fail.
    Copyright laws exist either for the protection of the creator, or for the benefit of the public. There is no middle ground. As long as we keep entrusting the government (any government) to find the right “balance” between the two, we are destined to keep on making up exclusions from limitations on exceptions from the rights – without even stopping for a second to question why we are doing this.

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